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The Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies at Stanford University

The Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies is the central forum for the study of Islam and Muslim societies at Stanford University.

About

Working within and across academic disciplines and world regions, theirfaculty explores the religion of Islam in all its internal complexity and in diverse social and cultural contexts.  To enrich Stanford students’ exposure to the study of Islam at all levels, theypromote coursework, administer grants, and coordinate an undergraduate specialization as part of Global Studies minor.

The Mission

They have three goals that focus on research, teaching, and public outreach:

  • They support interdisciplinary research and scholarship on Islamic cultures and societies across the globe.  Working within and across academic disciplines and world regions, their affiliates explore the religion of Islam in all its internal complexity and in diverse social and cultural contexts.  They host lectures and conferences that advance scholarship in the field and support undergraduate and graduate student research.
  • They coordinate and promote interdisciplinary coursework in the field of Islamic Studies. To enrich Stanford students’ exposure to the study of Islam at all levels, they support the academic pursuits of undergraduates and graduates and administer student grants for fieldwork, advanced language training and internships. For undergraduates seeking a Minor in Global Studies, they coordinate the specialization in Islamic Studies.
  • They actively engage multiple audiences with the goal of deepening public understanding of Islam and Muslim societies.  Through their support for public lectures, artistic performances, exhibitions, and their online resources for K-12 teachers and students, they serve as a resource for the public and educators alike.

Courses

Arts, Literatures and Culture

History, Politics and International Relations

Religion

Languages

Requirements:

  1. Completion of 28 units that includes GLOBAL 101 Critical Issues in Global Affairs (3 units)
  2. A minimum of 25 units of Islamic studies-related courses.
  3. At least one course must be an area-specific entry course focusing on the Islamic world. The following courses may be used to fulfill this requirement:
    • POLISCI 149T Middle Eastern Politics (5 units)
    • HISTORY 84N The American Empire in the Middle East (4 units)
    • HISTORY 82C Making of the Islamic World, 600-1500 (3 units)
    • RELIGST 180 Gender Relations in Islam (4 units)
    • HISTORY 181B Formation of the Contemporary Middle East (5 units)
    • HISTORY 280D Islamic Institutions: Economic and Legal History of the Middle East (4-5 units)
    • GLOBAL 137 Islam in America (4 units)
    • COMPLIT 201 Classics of Persian Literature (3-5 units)
    • POLISCI 149S Islam, Iran, and the West (5 units)
    • RELIGST 139 Religion along the Silk Road (4 units)
    • RELIGST 218 Islam, Race and Revolution: A Pan-American Approach (3-5 units)
    • GLOBAL 136 Contemporary Muslim Political Thought (4 units)
  4. At least one course must be from each of the following areas:
    • Islamic Arts, Literatures, and Cultures
    • Islam, History, and Politics
    • Religion of Islam
  5. Completion of three courses in a relevant language such as Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Ottoman Turkish, Urdu, Pashto, Kazakh, or Swahili.
  6. A capstone project such as a minimum 25-page research paper, directed reading and research with an Abbasi Program faculty member, or an overseas study, internship, or language training program that is approved by the Abbasi Program.
    • Students present their work in an end-of-year capstone seminar with other SGS minors and led by SGS faculty.

Undergraduate Student Grants

The following types of projects are supported:

  1. Intensive language study 
    the proposed course of language study must be integral to the applicant’s academic or professional development. Priority will be given to training in languages not offered on campus or for advanced training in languages where the student has exhausted campus resources.
  2. Fieldwork or Advanced Research Projects
    Priority will be given to projects that may lead to a senior or honors thesis.
  3. Public Service or Internships in the U.S. and Abroad
    Funds may be used to fully or partially defray the costs of a relevant internship opportunity in a local, national, or international organization.
  4. Study Abroad Programs 
    Funds may be used to fully or partially defray the costs of attending an overseas study program with an academic focus on Islam and Muslim societies.

Graduate Student Grants

The following types of projects are supported:

  1. Intensive language study in the United States or abroad
    The proposed course of language study must be integral to the applicant’s academic development or research (such as the M.A. thesis or the dissertation). Priority will be given to training in languages not offered on campus or for advanced training in languages where the student has exhausted campus resources.
  2. Fieldwork and Advanced Research Projects
    Proposals should be related to advanced work connected to the thesis/dissertation topic or exploration of an area that may lead to the thesis/dissertation.

Contact

Address: Encina Hall West, Rm 212

417 Galvez Mall

Stanford, CA 94305

Phone: (650) 736-8169

Email: abbasiprogram@stanford.edu

Website: islamicstudies.stanford.edu

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